Anticipate This!™ | Patent and Trademark Law Blog

They Invented What? (No. 190)

Posted in They Invented What? by Jake Ward on December 1, 2010

U.S. Pat. No. 7,735,491: Methods of treating respiratory disorders.

What is claimed is:

1. A method of treating a sleep disorder comprising: inserting at least a portion of a nasal respiratory device into a subject’s nasal cavity; and securing the nasal respiratory device in communication with the subject’s nasal cavity, wherein the nasal respiratory device comprises an airflow resistor that inhibits exhalation more than it inhibits inhalation and a holdfast and wherein the nasal respiratory device is secured using an adhesive.

2. The method of claim 1, further comprising compressing at least a portion of the holdfast of the nasal respiratory device, wherein the holdfast is a compliant holdfast, so that the portion can fit at least partly within the subject’s nasal cavity.

3. The method of claim 1, wherein the nasal respiratory device is secured at least partly within the subject’s nasal cavity by friction.

4. The method of claim 1, further comprising removing the nasal respiratory device from sterile packaging before securing the nasal respiratory device.

5. The method of claim 1, further comprising removing the nasal respiratory device from clean packaging before securing the nasal respiratory device.

6. The method of claim 1, wherein the airflow resistor inhibits inhalation only negligibly or not at all.

7. The method of claim 1, wherein the airflow resistor comprises a first airflow pathway and a second airflow pathway, and further wherein the first airflow pathway is configured to be open during inhalation and closed during exhalation, and the second airflow pathway is configured to be open during inhalation and exhalation.

8. The method of claim 1, wherein the step of inserting comprises inserting the nasal respiratory device into the subject’s nasal cavity so that at least one pathway through the nasal respiratory device is open during both exhalation and inhalation.

9. The method of claim 1, wherein the step of inserting at least a portion of the nasal respiratory device into the subject’s nasal cavity comprises inserting a nasal respiratory device having a common inhalation and exhalation flow pathway.

10. The method of claim 1, wherein the step of inserting comprises inserting at least a portion of the nasal respiratory device into the subject’s nasal cavity so that the entire airflow resistor is adjacent to or at least partially within the subject’s nasal cavity.

11. The method of claim 1, further comprising inhibiting exhalation more than inhalation by opening and closing the airflow resistor without contacting the sides of a passageway through the nasal device with any movable portion of the airflow resistor.

12. A method of treating snoring comprising: placing a nasal respiratory device at least partly into or at least partly over a subject’s nasal cavity, wherein the nasal respiratory device includes an airflow resistor configured to inhibit exhalation more than inhalation; and securing the nasal respiratory device in communication with the subject’s nasal cavity to reduce snoring and wherein the nasal respiratory device is adhesively secured.

13. The method of claim 12, wherein the nasal respiratory device is secured to at least one of the subject’s nostrils.

14. The method of claim 12, wherein the airflow resistor inhibits inhalation only negligibly or not at all.

15. The method of claim 12, wherein the airflow resistor comprises a first airflow pathway and a second airflow pathway, and further wherein the first airflow pathway is configured to be open during inhalation and closed during exhalation, and the second airflow pathway is configured to be open during inhalation and exhalation.

16. The method of claim 12, wherein the nasal respiratory device is secured at least partly within the subject’s nasal cavity by friction.

17. The method of claim 12, wherein the step of placing comprises placing the nasal respiratory device so that at least one pathway through the nasal respiratory device is open during both exhalation and inhalation.

18. The method of claim 12, wherein the step of placing comprises placing a nasal respiratory device having a common inhalation and exhalation flow pathway.

19. The method of claim 12, wherein the step of placing comprises placing at least a portion of the nasal respiratory device into the subject’s nasal cavity so that the entire airflow resistor is adjacent to or at least partially within the subject’s nasal cavity.

20. A method of treating a sleep disorder comprising: compressing the holdfast region of a nasal respiratory device, wherein the nasal respiratory device includes an airflow resistor configured to inhibit exhalation more than inhalation; and placing at least a portion of the holdfast region of the nasal respiratory device at least partly within the nasal cavity of a subject suffering from a sleep disorder and allowing the compressed holdfast region to expand within the subject’s nasal cavity and wherein the airflow resistor comprises a first airflow pathway and a second airflow pathway, and further wherein the first airflow pathway is configured to be open during inhalation and closed during exhalation, and the second airflow pathway is configured to be open during inhalation and exhalation.

21. The method of claim 20, wherein the sleep disorder is snoring.

22. The method of claim 20, wherein the sleep disorder is sleep apnea.

23. The method of claim 20, wherein the airflow resistor inhibits inhalation only negligibly or not at all.

24. The method of claim 20, wherein the holdfast comprises a foam holdfast.

25. A method of treating a sleep disorder comprising: adhesively securing a nasal respiratory device in communication with a subject’s nasal cavity, wherein the nasal respiratory device comprises an airflow resistor that inhibits exhalation more than it inhibits inhalation and an adhesive holdfast configured to secure the nasal respiratory device in communication with the nasal cavity and wherein the step of adhesively securing the nasal respiratory device comprises securing the nasal respiratory device at least partly over at least one of the subject’s nostrils.

26. The method of claim 25, wherein the step of adhesively securing the nasal respiratory device comprises securing the nasal respiratory device at least partly over both of the subject’s nostrils.

27. The method of claim 25, wherein the step of adhesively securing the nasal respiratory device comprises securing the nasal respiratory device at least partly within one of the subject’s nostrils.

28. The method of claim 25, further comprising removing the nasal respiratory device from sterile packaging before adhesively securing the nasal respiratory device.

29. The method of claim 25, further comprising removing the nasal respiratory device from clean packaging before adhesively securing the nasal respiratory device.

30. The method of claim 25, wherein the airflow resistor inhibits inhalation only negligibly or not at all.

31. The method of claim 25, wherein the airflow resistor comprises a first airflow pathway and a second airflow pathway, and further wherein the first airflow pathway is configured to be open during inhalation and closed during exhalation, and the second airflow pathway is configured to be open during inhalation and exhalation.

32. A method of treating a sleep disorder comprising: placing a nasal respiratory device having a compliant holdfast at least partly within the nasal cavity of a subject suffering from a sleep disorder; sealing and securing the nasal respiratory device against the nasal cavity so that the device is disposed at least partially outside of the subject’s nasal cavity; and securing the nasal respiratory device in communication with the subject’s nasal cavity, wherein the nasal respiratory device respiratory device comprises an opening configured to communicate with the nasal cavity and is configured for use while sleeping and further comprises an airflow resistor that inhibits exhalation more than it inhibits inhalation.

33. The method of claim 32, wherein the disorder is snoring.

34. The method of claim 32, wherein the disorder is sleep apnea.

35. The method of claim 32, wherein the airflow resistor inhibits inhalation only negligibly or not at all.

36. The method of claim 32, wherein the holdfast comprises a foam holdfast.

37. The method of claim 32, wherein the airflow resistor comprises a first airflow pathway and a second airflow pathway, and further wherein the first airflow pathway is configured to be open during inhalation and closed during exhalation, and the second airflow pathway is configured to be open during inhalation and exhalation.

38. The method of claim 32, wherein the step of placing comprises placing a nasal respiratory device having a compliant holdfast that is a distinct structure from the airflow resistor.

39. The method of claim 32, further comprising inhibiting exhalation more than inhalation by opening and closing the airflow resistor without contacting the sides of a passageway through the nasal device with any movable portion of the airflow resistor.

40. A method of treating a sleep disorder comprising: placing a nasal respiratory device at least partly into a subject’s nasal cavity, wherein the nasal respiratory device includes an airflow resistor configured to inhibit exhalation more than inhalation; securing the nasal respiratory device in communication with the subject’s nasal cavity; and monitoring the subject’s breathing during sleep and wherein the step of securing the nasal respiratory device comprises adhesively securing the nasal respiratory device at least partially over the subject’s nasal cavity.

41. The method of claim 40, wherein the step of securing the nasal respiratory device comprises securing the nasal respiratory device at least partly within the subject’s nasal cavity by friction.

4 Responses

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  1. Matt said, on December 2, 2010 at 9:11 am

    Just secured by friction? No superglue? I guess if breathe-right strips made it …

  2. Dave Purdue said, on December 2, 2010 at 10:08 am

    What about “Up your nose with a rubber hose”? This is not new!

  3. Mike Brown said, on December 2, 2010 at 10:44 am

    “…comprises an airflow resistor that inhibits exhalation more than it inhibits inhalation…”

    …so that you replace the sleep disorder with asymmetrical respiration, such that your lungs expand until you explode.

  4. Liz said, on July 20, 2012 at 12:46 pm

    Nope, there’s an adhesive… because gluing something inside your nostrils won’t worsen the problem…


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