Anticipate This!™ | Patent and Trademark Law Blog

They Invented What? (No. 210)

Posted in They Invented What? by Jake Ward on October 20, 2011

U.S. Pat. Appl. Pub. No. 20060259306:  Business method protecting jokes.

JW Note:  Many thanks to Joseph Page for bringing this application to our attention!

Abstract:
The specification describes a method of protecting jokes by filing patent applications therefor, and gives examples of novel jokes to be thus protected. Specific jokes to be protected by the process of the invention include stories about animals playing ball-games, in which alliteration is used in the punch-line; a scheme for raising money for charity by providing dogs for carriage by Underground passengers; and the joke that consists in filing a patent application to protect jokes. A novel type of patent application, one that claims itself, and hence is termed `homoproprietary`, is disclosed.

Claims:

1. The process of protecting a novel joke which comprises filing a patent application defining the novel features of the joke.

2. The process claimed in claim 1 in which the patent application is subsequently maintained.

3. The process as claimed in claim 2 in which the patent application is prosecuted at least to official publication.

4. The process as claimed in either of claims 2 or 3 in which the patent application is prosecuted to grant or refusal.

5. A process claimed in any of claims 1 to 4 in which the joke is an adaptation or improvement of a known joke.

6. A process as claimed in any of claims 1-5 in which the joke is an anecdote, a pun, a wisecrack, irony, a ‘shaggy dog story’, or a cartoon.

7. A process as claimed in any of claims 1-6 in which the joke is self-referential.

8. A joke protected by a process claimed in any of claims 1-7.

9. A patent application or patent claiming a joke as claimed in claim 8.

10. A joke relating to the unexpected but partial skill of animals (preferably large mammals or birds) in sports involving spheroidal projectiles, characterised in that the punch-line employs alliteration.

11. A joke as claimed in claim 10 in which the punch line takes the form: “Whoever heard of a (large animal beginning with plosive consonant x) who could (perform sporting action beginning with plosive consonant x)!”

12. In a locus in which the behaviour of the public is subject to a promulgated rule intended to be conditional, the joke which comprises misinterpreting the rule as absolute, and providing means for enabling the public to conform to the rule so misinterpreted.

13. The joke claimed in claim 12 in which the locus is a public transport system.

14. A joke claimed in either of claims 12 or 13 in which the enabling means is provided against consideration.

15. A joke claimed in claim 14 wherein at least part of the consideration is stated to be devoted to charitable causes.

16. A joke as claimed in any of claims 12 to 15 in which the enabling means are dogs.

17. The joke which comprises the filing of a patent application to protect the method of protecting jokes by filing one or more patent applications thereon.

18. The process of reciting a joke claimed in any of claims 8 and 10-17.

19. The process of rehearsing a joke claimed in any of claims 8 and 12-17.

20. A joke claimed in any of claims 8 and 11-17 recorded on a medium, e.g. paper or videotape.

21. A joke as claimed in claim 18 in which the medium is computer-readable, for example a hard disk, floppy, CD or DVD.

22. A process claimed in any of claims 1-7 in which the patent application is filed, or claims priority from an application that is filed, on 1 April,

23. A homoproprietary patent application or patent.

24. An application claiming priority from a patent application claimed in claim 23, or a patent granted on such an application

25. A kit of parts for carrying out the joke claimed in any of claims 12-16.

One Response

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  1. les said, on November 15, 2011 at 3:27 pm

    This application was abandoned after the first office action. However, it shouldn’t have been. The rejections were more absurd than the application.


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