Anticipate This!™ | Patent and Trademark Law Blog

They Invented What? (No. 4)

Posted in General Commentary by Jake Ward on September 20, 2015

Anticipate This!™ | Patent and Trademark Law Blog

U.S. Pat. No. 5,058,833: Spaceship to harness radiations in interstellar flights

rocketpropeller

What I claim is:

1. A craft for flight in the atmosphere or space, comprising a cylindrical body having a front end and a rear end, propulsion means positioned in said rear end, and a propeller mounted about a shaft extending from said front end, said propeller being rotatable about and independent of said shaft.

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They Invented What? (No. 3)

Posted in General Commentary by Jake Ward on September 9, 2015

Anticipate This!™ | Patent and Trademark Law Blog

U.S. Pat. No. 5,553,327: Hat made from cardboard beverage container and method of making the same

327FIG1

We claim:

1. A method of making a hat, comprising the steps of:

(a) cutting a plurality of hat elements from cardboard product container material including graphics disposed on an exterior surface thereof, wherein the cutting step comprises the steps of:

(1) cutting a brim, first and second side members, first and second connecting members and a top member from the material according to predetermined patterns, wherein the side members include top, bottom, front and rear edges; and

(2) forming an aperture in the brim; and

(b) assembling the hat elements to form a hat, wherein the graphics printed on the exterior surface of the container material are disposed on visible exterior surfaces of the hat, and wherein the assembly step includes the steps of:

(1) joining bottom edges of the first and second…

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They Invented What? (No. 2)

Posted in General Commentary by Jake Ward on July 6, 2015

Anticipate This!™ | Patent and Trademark Law Blog

U.S. Pat. No. 6,368,227: Method of swinging on a swing

 US6368227 FIG 1

I claim:

1. A method of swinging on a swing, the method comprising the steps of:

     a) suspending a seat for supporting a user between only two chains that are hung from a tree branch;

     b) positioning a user on the seat so that the user is facing a direction perpendicular to the tree branch;

     c) having the user pull alternately on one chain to induce movement of the user and the swing toward one side, and then on the other chain to induce movement of the user and the swing toward the other side; and

     d) repeating step

     c) to create side-to-side swinging motion, relative to the user, that is parallel to the tree branch.

2. The method of claim 1, wherein the method is practiced independently by the user to create the…

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Google Announcing the Patent Purchase Promotion – May 8-22

Posted in General Commentary by Jake Ward on April 29, 2015

From the Google Public Policy Blog, with some traction in the news this week-

Announcing the Patent Purchase Promotion

We invite you to sell us your patents. The Patent Purchase Promotion is an experimental marketplace for patents that’s simple, easy to use, and fast.

Patent owners sell patents for numerous reasons (such as the need to raise money or changes in a company’s business direction). Unfortunately, the usual patent marketplace can sometimes be challenging, especially for smaller participants who sometimes end up working with patent trolls. Then bad things happen, like lawsuits, lots of wasted effort, and generally bad karma. Rarely does this provide any meaningful benefit to the original patent owner.

So today we’re announcing the Patent Purchase Promotion as an experiment to remove friction from the patent market. From May 8, 2015 through May 22, 2015, we’ll open a streamlined portal for patent holders to tell Google about patents they’re willing to sell at a price they set. As soon as the portal closes, we’ll review all the submissions, and let the submitters know whether we’re interested in buying their patents by June 26, 2015. If we contact you about purchasing your patent, we’ll work through some additional diligence with you and look to close a transaction in short order. We anticipate everyone we transact with getting paid by late August.

By simplifying the process and having a concentrated submission window, we can focus our efforts into quickly evaluating patent assets and getting responses back to potential sellers quickly. Hopefully this will translate into better experiences for sellers, and remove the complications of working with entities such as patent trolls.

There’s some fine print that you absolutely want to make sure you fully understand before participating, and we encourage participants to speak with an attorney. More detailed information about the Patent Purchase Promotion is available on our Patent Website, including all the fine print, the form to make a submission (which won’t go live until May 8), and details about what happens if Google agrees to buy your patent. Throughout this process, Google reserves the right to not transact for any reason.

We’re always looking at ways that can help improve the patent landscape and make the patent system work better for everyone. We ask everyone to remember that this program is an experiment (think of it like a 20 percent project for Google’s patent lawyers), but we hope that it proves useful and delivers great results to participants.

They Invented What? (No. 1)

Posted in General Commentary by Jake Ward on January 2, 2015

Anticipate This!™ | Patent and Trademark Law Blog

U.S. Pat. No. 3,963,275Method of breaking free-standing rock boulders

 

What is claimed is:

1.)  The method of fragmenting a free-standing boulder comprising

determining the average diameter of said boulder to determine the time required for sound to traverse said average diameter,

determining the compressive strength of said boulder,

selecting a projectile having a mass which will establish an impact stress within said boulder greater than the compressive strength of the boulder, when impacted upon said boulder with a velocity which causes an energy transfer to said boulder within a time less than said determined time,

loading said cannon with said selected projectile,

loading said cannon with a charge which when detonated will cause said projectile to impact upon said boulder with said velocity,

aiming said cannon at said boulder, and

detonating said charge.

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Inventing to Nowhere Documentary.

Posted in General Commentary by Jake Ward on December 19, 2014

JW Note:  Very interesting documentary video on Youtube relating to the importance of a strong patent system.  Hat tip to the PatentlyO blog.

They Invented What? (No. 242)

Posted in General Commentary by Jake Ward on December 11, 2014

U.S. Patent Appl. Pub. No. 20080299533: Naughty or nice meter.

JW Note: Wishing a Happy Holidays to all!  See you in 2015!

For more holiday TIW? from years past, click here.

naughtynice

BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION:

Undoubtedly, the abstract and background show the uniqueness of the product of this invention. The “Naughty or Nice Meter”, although initiated from the Christmas Holiday season, is a product that allows a visual representation of being “Naughty or Nice”. The product honors and exemplifies the time-honored traditional saying as to whether you have been “Naughty or Nice”. It also transcends the original Christmas Holiday Season to all Holiday seasons and perhaps even birthdays or even a day-to-day “Naughty or Nice Meter.” It could not be said enough that the “Naughty or Nice Meter” is a visual product designed to calibrate if you have been “Naughty or Nice”. No other product exists.

CLAIMS:

1. A “Naughty or Nice Meter” grading product comprising of 12 behavioral questions, a calculator and a “Meter” numbered in a range from Zero (0) to Sixty (60).

(more…)

A Statue for Toulmin.

Posted in General Commentary by Jake Ward on October 10, 2014

A top post at the AT! Blog recently – and one of my favorites over the past several years. Enjoy!

Anticipate This!™ | Patent and Trademark Law Blog

flyer  

In the small city of Springfield, Ohio, now stands an 8-foot statue dedicated to the Wright Brother’s patent attorney, Harry Toulmin.  Mr. Toulmin was the patent lawyer who prepared and prosecuted the patent for Wilbur and Orville Wright’s flying machine . . . yes, the original airplane.

According to this article at Law.com, Toulmin helped the Wright brothers apply for five patents, including the 1906 flying machine’s patent (U.S. Pat. No. 821,393 or the ‘393 patent).  Other Wright patents also include U.S. Pat. Nos. , , , , and ,

The above article fails to mention, however, that the brothers only turned to Toulmin after the original application they had drafted themselves was rejected by the USPTO.  The ‘393 patent drafted by Toulmin had broad claims covering methods of controlling a flying machine, regardless of whetherthe machine was powered.  In particular, the patent described a system that allowed the aircraft to be controlled in flight, and specifically a…

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