Anticipate This!™ | Patent and Trademark Law Blog

They Invented What? (No. 202)

Posted in They Invented What? by Jake Ward on May 12, 2011

U.S. Pat. No. 4,625,468: Temporary/portable nuclear fallout shelter.

I claim:

1. A portable shelter for placement over a hole in the ground comprising in combination,

a tent enclosure having a floor with a tubular section extendable downwardly therefrom,

means for supporting the tent enclosure to form an enclosed volume above the hole, the tubular section of the tub floor extending downwardly into and lining the hole,

a shield membrane approximately dimensioned and having sufficient surface area to completely cover the tent enclosure when erected, with its circumferential edge extending into and partially buried in a shallow trench excavated around the tent enclosure and hole.

2. The portable shelter of claim 1, wherein the shield membrane has a circumferential edge formed by a tubular enclosure integral with the membrane.

3. The portable shelter of claim 2, wherein the tubular enclosure forming the circumferential edge of the shield membrane is hermetic to provide fluid storage.

4. The portable shelter of claim 3, further including means communicating with the tubular enclosure forming the circumferential edge of the fly membrane for introducing and draining fluids into and from the tubular enclosure.

5. The portable shelter of claim 1, wherein the tent enclosure including the tubular section extendable from the floor are formed by tightly woven, rip-resistant panels joined together.

6. The portable shelter of claim 5, wherein the shield membrane is a coated, rip-resistant plastic sheet material reflective of solar radiations.

7. The portable shelter of claim 5, wherein the interior surfaces of the fabric panels and junctions between each panel are coated with a sealing material for rendering the tent enclosure essentially airtight.

8. The portable fallout shelter of claim 7, wherein the tent enclosure is formed of at least two modular unit enclosures connected together, each unit enclosure including a separate hexahedral tubular section extending downward from its floor, further including:

means for allowing occupants to move between the hexahedral tubular sections of the respective unit enclosures, and

means for hermetically isolating the respective hexahedral tubular sections from each other.

9. The portable fallout shelter of claim 5, further including pockets incorporated into the lining of the tubular section extending downwardly, the pockets opening into the tent enclosure, and means for hermetically sealing and isolating the pockets from the interior of the tent enclosure.

10. The portable fallout shelter of claim 9, wherein the pockets include vent tubes for allowing vapors emanating from wastes placed in the pockets to escape, and means located distant from the pocket for preventing gas flow through the tub into the pocket.

11. The portable fallout shelter of claim 1, further including walls and and a floor composed of concrete type materials forming a trench below the ground surface over which the tent enclosure is erected, the tubular section of the enclosure having a hexahedral configuration for lining the trench.

12. The portable fallout shelter of claim 11, wherein the trench has been filled with dirt, and including means for explosively excavating the dirt from the trench.

13. The shelter of claim 1, wherein the shield membrane is formed of at least two (2) modular membrane sheets, each sheet having means forming its circumferential edge for hermetic engagement with similar means, forming the circumferential edge of the remaining sheets.

14. A portable fallout shelter for use in combination with a hole in the ground comprising:

a tent enclosure formed of a hermetic flexible material, including:

a plurality of inflatable tubular rib sections,

a circumferential edge formed into a tubular section for containing water extending from the exterior perimeter of the tent enclosure,

a floor having sufficient slack to extend downwardly into the hole for lining the hole,

the tent enclosure being erected by inflating the inflatable tubular sections with a gas, the enclosure being anechored by filling the tubular section forming the circumferential edge with water and partially burying the water-filled circumferential edge in a shallow trench excavated around the perimeter of the enclosure.

15. The portable fallout shelter of claim 14, further including an access port through a side wall of the enclosure and means for closing and hermetically sealing the access port from the interior of the enclosure.

16. The portable fallout shelter of claim 15 or 5, further including means for circulating and filtering air into and out of the enclosure.

3 Responses

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  1. Patent Agent said, on May 19, 2011 at 3:41 am

    Another Jewel Jake – thanks! Million laughs to be had at AT

  2. vreejack said, on September 19, 2011 at 12:47 pm

    It looks uncomfortable. The guy in the illustration seems to be impatient. Don’t worry fella, it’s only two more months to go before the short-lived nuclides are gone. Good thing it’s temporary–I’d hate to have to spend the rest of my life in one…though anybody using it would likely be doing just that.

    Big problem with this thing is that overpressure from the initial blast would likely rupture it. But as long as you are only worried about fallout–say, downwind of a blast or Chernobyl–then this thing will get you through the worst of it for a few days. Sore muscles are a temporary nuisance, but radioactive contamination is forever (or until you die from it, whichever comes first.)

  3. Malcom Corridoni said, on January 29, 2012 at 8:41 pm

    A patent is a government granted right that allows the inventor to exclude anyone else from making, using or selling the invention in the country that issued the patent. The government grants this right to help encourage inventors to spend the time, money and effort to invent new products, technologies and the like.


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